When it comes to grooming tips, Queer Eye‘s “Fab Five” know what’s up. So when one of them shares their skin-care secrets, that’s worth listening to.

Karamo Brown, the resident culture expert on the show, recently shared his secret to silky-smooth skin, and as it turns out it has nothing to do with pricey products or an intense, multistep regimen. In fact, Brown’s skin-care hero costs $0, and chances are you probably have it in your house — more specifically, in your freezer.

The star revealed on Twitter that he uses ice cubes on his face once a day to keep his glow intact. “I use a wash cloth to pick up one ice cube. I then run the ice cube along my entire face until it melts,” he wrote. “It does wonders for my complexion, pimples, wrinkles, etc.” He also shared a screenshot of some of the benefits that ice can have on your skin, including exfoliation, soothing sunburns and inflammation, and boosting circulation.

Brown isn’t the first celeb who’s put his ice tray to good use for something other than cocktails. Kate Moss has been known to soak her face in ice water for the sake of younger-looking skin (…does anyone else get chills just reading that?), and Madonna stores her beauty tools in the freezer to give them an added level of effectiveness.

Brown’s ice hack isn’t the only free beauty tip worth stealing from the Queer Eye squad. Fellow Fab Five member Jonathan Van Ness recently told Bustle that one of the keys to having pretty hair is saying nice things to it, a theory that’s somewhat backed by science. (It has to do with a study about how water crystals reacted to positive versus negative language.) Essentially, this gives all of us permission to stand in front of the mirror and compliment ourselves on a regular basis, which sounds like a lot more fun than rubbing ice cubes on our faces. Either way, the Queer Eye cast has now given us two new steps to add to our beauty routines that won’t cost a thing.


More celebrity skin-care tips and tricks to consider:


Now, see how skin care has evolved in 100 years:



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